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Thread: Bore Snake

  1. #1
    GunLoad Trainee
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    Default Bore Snake

    It seems the Bore Snake is one of the more popular new gun cleaning produces. Appears to be an upgrade of the old military pull-through cleaning kit. These old pull-throughs were blamed by some for ruining the crown on many old military rifles. I own several bore snakes and really love them. Their ease of use makes me much more diligent about cleaning and often I get my guns cleaned while still at the range. I am not a benchrest shooter so am not worried about getting the last speck of jacket fouling out.

    Does anyone see a down side to using the Bore Snake on a regular basis?

    Jim B.
    Last edited by Jim B.; 05-13-2005 at 01:51 PM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim B.
    It seems the Bore Snake is one of the more popular new gun cleaning produces. Appears to be an upgrade of the old military pull-through cleaning kit. These old pull-throughs were blamed by some for ruining the crown on many old military rifles. I own several bore snakes and really love them. Their ease of use makes me much more diligent about cleaning and often I get my guns cleaned while still at the range. I am not a benchrest shooter so am not worried about getting the last speck of jacket fouling out.

    Does anyone see a down side to using the Bore Snake on a regular basis?

    Jim B.
    Jim,

    The only limitation I see is that what ever they pick up, you run through everytime. After awhile, they .... "could" become abrasive. If you understand that you are probably OK. Cause you can ruin barrels with any method if you aren't careful.

  3. #3
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    stick it in a bag and run it through the washing machine after each use. Then no worry about what you carry from one use to the next.
    Wayne the Shrink

    There is no 'right' that requires me to work for you or you to work for me!

  4. #4
    Dazed And Confused GSPKurt's Avatar
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    Thumbs down

    Next time you finish using that bore snake, get out your cleaning rod and jag and run a patch soaked in Butch's or even Hoppe's #9 through it. Then post here what you think of that bore snake. I won't use 'em.
    Kurt Hargarten
    Trenton, FL.
    I'm out of my mind, be back in a minute...

  5. #5
    Dogs Like Him versifier's Avatar
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    Default

    They are no substitute for a good, thorough cleaning. But, they are a great field cleaner, for dirty powder, muzzle in mud or snow, etc. I have them in just about every caliber. No system is perfect, and this one is no exception, however, they have saved more than a few days of hunting for me and friends, and I wouldn't be without one. I use solvents when needed, and I use patches and brushes for applying them, and I also made and use an electronic bore cleaner for when there are serious fouling problems - bore snakes are not the answer for that, no matter what the marketing departments say. Knowing their limitations (and not letting them get too dirty), they are very useful tools and worthwhile additions to your cleaning tools collection. Another situation where they have paid for themselves is shopping for used rifles, especially at shows - you want to see what the bore looks like under layers of dust and oil, you can tell after one pass if the lands are still sharp or the throat has been cooked. (They won't tell you much about pitting). Not every seller is willing to let you run one through, and for me, that usually separates the honest ones from the scammers.
    "Stand your ground.
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    But if they mean to have a war let it begin here."
    - Capt. Parker, Lexington Militia, April 19, 1775

  6. #6
    Private Baldy's Avatar
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    I have bore snakes in several calibers. When I am tring a new load or working one up I might get more lead than I like in the barrel. While the barrel is still warm I'll run the bore snake through with some Shooters Choice lead remover on it. If it's real bad I leave the snake in it and let it soak till I get home. Seems to make it a little easier to clean. I clean my snakes once in awhile. Put them in a bag and drop them in the washer.
    " Free Men" do not ask permission to bear arms.

  7. #7
    lovedogs
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    I don't use 'em cuz I like real clean bores but I see Versifier's points. Well taken, Versifier. You're so sensible! I only had a problem once. I poked my .44 Contender bbl. in the snow while climbing a hill on a coyote hunt. I had nothing like a rod or a snake to clean the snow out with. I was a long ways from anything to clean it out with. Finally, I took pieces of toilet paper out of my pack and poked it through with "expertly" whittled thin Ponderosa limbs. I was glad I always carry bum fodder in my pack... never leave home without it! A snake might have done a better job if I could have gotten it through the snow so I could pull it through. Now I always tape the muzzle when in snow.

  8. #8
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    You could carry a small roll of nylon weedcutter line with you. Rigid enough to clear barrel of snow or dirt and to push a patch through with.

    Or a piece of semi-stiff nylon tubing, the kind used for compressed air. I pushed a folded piece of thin nylon line through the hose. Open up the loop and insert a patch and you have a home-made pullthrough... A knot on the loop prevents it from inadvertedly being pulled back too much.

  9. #9
    Dazed And Confused GSPKurt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by utk View Post
    You could carry a small roll of nylon weedcutter line with you. Rigid enough to clear barrel of snow or dirt and to push a patch through with.

    Or a piece of semi-stiff nylon tubing, the kind used for compressed air. I pushed a folded piece of thin nylon line through the hose. Open up the loop and insert a patch and you have a home-made pullthrough... A knot on the loop prevents it from inadvertedly being pulled back too much.
    That's a great idea! Thanks!
    Kurt Hargarten
    Trenton, FL.
    I'm out of my mind, be back in a minute...

  10. #10
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    "If it's real bad I leave the snake in it and let it soak till I get home."


    You know, that sounds like a darn good idea

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