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Thread: Good Mold for 30-30 Marlin micro grove???

  1. #1
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    Default Good Mold for 30-30 Marlin micro grove???

    Could anyone suggest a good mold for this gun. The Lee 170 g fn all seem to be rubibing the sides of the chamber and the the lever action really has to be pushed in hard at the end to chamber the bullet. I have seated the bullet down to 2.45 and don't really think I should go much further. Im sure there are other molds that makes a boolit that does not have that problem. Thanks All!

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    Dogs Like Him versifier's Avatar
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    Lyman's 311041 is a hunting bullet specifically designed for the .30-30, but so were Lee's 150FN and 170FN.

    I have never had a feeding/function problem with Lee's 170, and looking at your post I don't think the problem is the bullet. The OAL in my notes when using the bullet's crimping groove is 2.340". Reducing your OAL to the correct length ought to clear up the problem. If it doesn't, post again and we'll figure it out.
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    Default Crimp goove

    I called lee and they told me that SAMI speces is 2.45 at a minimum and I was seating them at 2.52. I still have a problem of rubbing at 2.45. I will check if the 2.37 you suggested works better. Is it still safe to shoot from that setting? I ordered that Lyman die and should have it at the end of the week. It appears that the bullet is more curved at the sides where the lee 170 fn is more rounded. Do you think that is correct?

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    Dogs Like Him versifier's Avatar
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    They are quite safe to shoot at that OAL or I would never have considered posting it. I have shot several thousand of them in a variety of .30-30 rifles and handguns using RL7, 3031, 4895, WC860, and several pistol powders with no problems at all. Cast bullets produce lower pressures than the same weight jacketed bullets, and the reduced loads usually used with them lower pressure levels even more.

    With any new cast bullet I seat very long in an unprimed/uncharged case and keep trying and shortening it until it feeds and chambers correctly. Then I crimp it in place and use the resulting dummy to quickly set up my seating die the next time I am using that bullet. Every chamber is different and you have to be accordingly flexible. I chose that OAL because it worked in all the chambers I tried it in - some of them no doubt would have allowed a longer OAL, but as they all functioned and shot acceptably at that length I went with it. The location of crimping grooves on different bullets sometimes makes up your mind for you in that you sometimes have to go a little deeper to get a firm and solid crimp on the flat or in the groove.

    The figures Lee provided probably worked great in whatever was used as a test firearm by whoever generated the data. They don't do their own testing - their manual, though quite handy, is a compilation of several different bullet and powder company sources.

    If you don't have one already, I highly recommend you get a copy of Lyman's Cast Bullet Handbook, one of the best data sources available.
    "Stand your ground.
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    First of all I want to thank you for your response. I was not implying that you would give me bad info! I seated 5 to the 2.35 and test shot a bullet . I am at home not at the range so i can't say about accuracy but all 5 chambered and I shot one. I do have that lyman cast bullet book and on page 39 bullet #31141 oaL is 2.51 and the rest of the bullets associated with a 3030 load are 2.447-2.62. Being that I am a novice reloader for cast bullets I just want to make SURE that I am doing the right thing.
    I have ordered the Lyman bullet mold so maybe that will reload at the OAL in the Lyman and Cast bullet book. I guess I am still confused as to why these bullets do not load by what the book says or the mounting crimp on the bullet ends and I have to press them that far into the case above the crimp groove. Maybe you have some insight because you seem to know what you are talking about. I would love to hear your input
    Thanks
    Bill

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    runfiverun runfiverun's Avatar
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    Default

    if you find a depth that works for you and is accurate enough.
    you can easily trim a few necks back down to where the crimp groove is. and try a couple with a light roll crimp.
    it sounds like the nose of your boolit is hitting the rifling and the hard closing is your nose engraving the rifling.
    you could fix the nose size through an alloy change.
    in my wifes 7x57 i had a very accurate load with a bore riding boolit. it was a bit tight when camming the bolt closed. i just started rubbing a very slight amount of lanolin on the bore riding part of the boolit.
    it eased the bolt closing so much that it felt like a jaxketed round with no engraving.
    as a side benefit it increased accuracy also.
    yes i could have changed my alloy. but i use this rifle for varmints and such, and need the boolit to perform as much as be accurate.

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    I know you weren't implying that, I just wanted to reassure you.

    One assumption most loaders make until they have had to deal with many different actions and chambers is that every chamber for a given cartridge is pretty much the same. They aren't. Even SAAMI specs are a tolerance range, and the older the rifle the greater the possible dimensional variations. Every different manufacturer of chambering reamers produces a slightly different tool, and then you have to consider in addition how many times they are sharpened (and by whom) during their working lives and the dimensional changes that result. Every throat is cut differently, too, which can have an even greater effect on seating depth. I went into more detail about it in the other thread talking about chambering problems. Always ask when you are unsure, that's why we're here. I have been playing with cast bullets in the .30-30 for over 30 years and have tested dozens of different moulds in bolts, levers, and single shots, rifles and pistols. It is one of my favorite cast bullet cartridges. It is the individual throat/chamber that determines how long you can make a cartridge and not much to do with the rifle's manufacturer (none of them as far as I know make their own chambering reamers - they buy what they need from any of several specialty manufacturers when they need them depending on who has what in stock). If it really bothers you, you can have the throat modified by a gunsmith - it is not particularly difficult or expensive, and that will let you use longer OAL's.

    FWIW, you really don't need more than a 150gr bullet for deer hunting, but often a rifle will prefer a heavier bullet to a lighter one.
    "Stand your ground.
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    Ask Verbal Smith at LBT?
    Steve
    The Original Point and Click interface was a Smith & Wesson.

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    Dogs Like Him versifier's Avatar
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    Nowadays you can get hunting bullets specifically designed for Marlin leverguns from Ranch Dog. I have them in .30 & .35cal and accuracy and performance are everything advertised and more!

    http://www.ranchdogmolds.com/store/
    "Stand your ground.
    Do not fire unless fired upon.
    But if they mean to have a war let it begin here."
    - Capt. Parker, Lexington Militia, April 19, 1775

  10. #10
    GunLoad Trainee S.B.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by versifier View Post
    Nowadays you can get hunting bullets specifically designed for Marlin leverguns from Ranch Dog. I have them in .30 & .35cal and accuracy and performance are everything advertised and more!

    http://www.ranchdogmolds.com/store/
    I think there's a little more to it than just going out and buying them? Verbal may want to send you some soft lead slugs to use to determine how long the nose should be, there are feed issues to deal with and etc, before manufacturing a mold for you.
    http://lbtmoulds.com/
    He is very knowledgable on these things. Give him a call.
    Steve
    Last edited by S.B.; 07-29-2012 at 02:34 PM.
    The Original Point and Click interface was a Smith & Wesson.

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